My Blog

Posts for category: Sleep Disorders

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
July 21, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: sleep apnea  

How your sleep specialist in Columbia SC can help you sleep soundly

Are you waking up suddenly, gasping for air? Do family members joke about your snoring? If so, you could have a potentially life-threatening condition known as sleep apnea. You need to learn more about this condition, and your sleep specialist can help.

Dr. Richard Bogan at Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia SC offers a wide range of medical services, including diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea.

What are the symptoms of sleep apnea?

If you think you might be suffering from sleep apnea, you are not alone. Over 18 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with sleep apnea.

These are some of the most common signs and symptoms of sleep apnea:

  • Waking up suddenly with a gasping, choking sensation
  • Waking up with a headache most mornings
  • Having a sore throat most mornings
  • Daytime sleepiness and grogginess
  • Frequent, loud snoring

Sleep apnea is caused by the tissue at the back of your throat relaxing and collapsing, partially blocking your airway while you sleep. This action keeps your vital organs from getting enough oxygen. Diminished oxygen levels can lead to problems with your vital organs, causing:

  • A stroke
  • A heart attack
  • Memory problems
  • Impaired mental ability
  • Impaired physical ability
  • A shortened lifespan

The good news is that your sleep specialist can help. The first step is a sleep study. If you do have sleep apnea, your sleep specialist may recommend:

A CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine. It is the most common treatment for sleep apnea. The machine is connected to a facepiece that you wear at night. The CPAP provides a continuous flow of oxygen through the tube which connects to the facepiece. You are guaranteed a continuous flow of oxygen during sleep, helping you get a great night of deep sleep.

If you have sleep apnea, call us

If you think you might have sleep apnea, there is no time to lose. You need your sleep. You need to call Dr. Richard Bogan of Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia SC at (803) 251-3093. Call today and sleep better soon!

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
June 19, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders

Is your child having trouble sleeping? Find out if a sleep disorder could be to blame.

It is estimated that around 50 percent of children will experience sleep problems at some point. If you find your child is dealing with daytime fatigue, mood swings, behavioral issues and trouble concentrating then these could be early signs of a sleep disorder. It’s important to recognize these patterns early on so that our Columbia, SC, sleep physician Dr. Richard Bogan can evaluate your child and determine if their problems stem from sleep problems.

Here are some common childhood sleep disorders,

Insomnia

Just like adults can develop insomnia, so too can children. While it’s normal for everyone (even kids) to have trouble sleeping sometimes, true childhood insomnia occurs when a child has trouble falling or staying asleep for at least two days a week. While you may not immediately recognize that your child is having trouble sleeping you may notice that your child suddenly refuses to go to bed or suddenly throws tantrums around bedtime. Sometimes children with ADHD, autism or mental health issues such as anxiety or depression may also be prone to bouts of insomnia.

Parasomnias

If your child is a sleepwalker, then they are dealing with a type of parasomnia. Parasomnias occur when a child is falling asleep, during REM sleep or when being aroused from non-REM sleep. Sleepwalking is just one common form but children with parasomnias may also experience sleep terrors (vivid nightmares that scare them awake in the middle of the night). Some children may experience temporary paralysis between the sudden sleep and awake transition or may hallucinate upon waking up.

Hypersomnia

Does your child or teen walk zombie-like throughout the day? Do they seem excessively tired despite getting enough sleep at night? While we may stereotypically make jokes about how teens often don’t want to get up for school or hit their alarm excessively, if these are common problems this might be worth looking into. After all, children with obstructive sleep apnea or delayed sleep phase syndrome may have trouble waking up during the day and may also experience brain fog, poor concentration and memory, and a decline in academic performance.

If trying to get your child to sleep is a losing battle it may be time to consult with our Columbia, SC, sleep doctor to find out if something more could be going on. The sooner a sleep disorder is diagnosed the sooner we can help your child find ways to cope with symptoms and improve their sleep. Turn to the experts at Bogan Sleep Consultants by calling (803) 251-3093.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
June 19, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: narcolepsy  

Learn more about the warning signs of narcolepsy.

Our brains are incredibly intricate and complex, and they are able to switch between cycles of sleep and awake. While this is fairly stable for most people, people with narcolepsy have cells within the brain that don’t work properly, which causes the sleep-wake cycles to become unstable. Wondering if you or your child could benefit from visiting our Columbia, SC, sleep physician Dr. Richard Bogan? You may, if you or someone you love is experiencing these symptoms,

Extreme daytime fatigue: Do you find it difficult to get through the day because you’re just so tired all the time? Do you find it challenging to get through your daily routine because of extreme drowsiness and fatigue? While this is a sign of narcolepsy, this can also be a symptom of other sleep disorders so it’s important to see a sleep doctor who can determine what’s causing your symptoms.

Restless sleep: it’s not uncommon for those with narcolepsy to have trouble staying asleep throughout the night. If you find yourself persistently waking up in the middle of the night and unable to fall back to sleep this could be a sign of narcolepsy.

Sleep paralysis: This is a rather scary symptom of narcolepsy and just like the name suggests, sleep paralysis causes the person to feel paralyzed. This only lasts a few seconds or minutes and typically occurs right before falling asleep or when waking up. Sometimes sleep paralysis is accompanied by vivid hallucinations (typically when someone is falling asleep).

What causes narcolepsy?

There are possibly a few things that can be to blame for narcolepsy. While the causes of narcolepsy are still under investigation there are a few factors that could increase your risk for narcolepsy including,

  • An autoimmune disorder
  • Genetics/family history of narcolepsy
  • Previous brain injuries

Here in Columbia, SC, our sleep doctor Dr. Richard Bogan addresses a wide range of sleep problems, from insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea to night terrors in children and narcolepsy. If you are experiencing issues with sleep call Bogan Sleep Consultants today at (803) 251-3093 to schedule a consultation.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
June 10, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: sleep apnea  

Do you snore loudly or tend to feel tired even after a “full” night’s slumber? You may be experiencing sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a type of sleep disorder in which your breathing is continually interrupted or stopped during sleep.

If you suspect that you suffer from sleep apnea, our sleep specialist here at Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia, SC, Dr. Richard Bogan, can diagnose and recommend appropriate interventions for your condition.

The Different Types of Sleep Apnea

  • OSA or Obstructive Sleep Apnea: This results from an airway obstruction when the soft tissue located at the back of your throat tends to collapse while you’re sleeping.
  • Central Sleep Apnea: In this case, the airway isn’t obstructed. Instead, the brain stops the muscles from breathing due to an abnormality in your respiratory control center.

Sleep Apnea Warning Signs

  • Snoring loudly
  • Gasping for air as you sleep
  • Having a dry mouth or sore throat upon waking up
  • Having a headache in the morning
  • Irritability or grumpiness
  • Heartburn
  • Drowsiness during the day
  • Forgetfulness
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Moments wherein you stop breathing while asleep
  • Concentration problems

Common Sleep Apnea Causes

Physical Blockages. Excessive fat stores or thickened tissue near the airway could inhibit airflow. When air squeezes through the obstructed path, it causes you to snore loudly.

Changes in the Muscle. As a person sleeps, the muscles that keep the airways free and open relax, as well as the tongue, making the airway narrow down. This relaxation often enables air to flow in and out of the lungs. However, in sleep apnea, it can’t.

Brain Function. CSA or central sleep apnea results in defective neurological functions responsible for unobstructed breathing. This is often linked to an underlying medical condition.

Treatment for Sleep Apnea

The treatment for sleep apnea aims to ensure that airflow is not blocked throughout sleep. Depending on your particular circumstances, your physician in Southfield, MI, may suggest the following treatment solutions:

  • Weight Loss. This helps alleviate the symptoms of OSA.
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy. This type of treatment is administered through the use of a facemask that is worn while you sleep. It provides positive airflow to ensure that the airways are open as you sleep at night.
  • Nasal Decongestants. These could lessen your loud snoring and is effective in treating mild OSA.
  • Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). This entails the elimination of additional tissues on the back of your throat. A tracheostomy, on the other hand, involves the perforation of an opening in the windpipe that goes around the blockage in the throat.

For Sleep Apnea Relief, We Can Help

Dial (803) 251-3093 to schedule an assessment with Dr. Richard Bogan here at Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia, SC.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
April 10, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders

Are your muscle spasms in the legs waking you up at night?

Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS) are the result of muscle cramps or spasms that usually occur in the lower extremities while asleep. It is also referred to as periodic limb movement disorder, and these muscle cramps or twitching can occur for a few minutes or even a few hours. Are you dealing with muscle twitching and jerking at night? Is your bed partner complaining about your constant movement? If so, then it might be time to see our Columbia, SC, sleep specialist Dr. Richard Bogan. Contact Bogan Sleep Consultants to learn more.

What Are the Symptoms of PLMS?

Many people with restless leg syndrome also have PLMS. It also occurs more frequently in patients over 65 years old. Patients who have also been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, REM sleep behavior disorder, and narcolepsy are more likely to experience PLMS. PLMS affects both genders and patients of all ages.

While muscle spasms may be bad enough to wake you up in the middle of the night, most people with PLMS don’t even know that they have it. The only reason they find out something is wrong is complaints from their partner. Those with disruptive sleep due to PLMS are more likely to experience daytime fatigue and non-restorative sleep.

What Causes PLMS?

Unfortunately, we do not currently know what causes PLMS; however, there are certain medications such as antihistamines and antidepressants that can exacerbate symptoms of PLMS. If you are noticing worsening symptoms while taking certain medications it’s important to talk with your sleep doctor in Columbia, SC.

How Is PLMS Treated?

With lifestyle modifications and medication, we can help reduce PLMS symptoms to improve the quality of your sleep. One major lifestyle change that can help is avoiding caffeine such as coffee, tea, chocolate, and sodas. If you are taking antidepressants, talk to your doctor about switching to another medication that won’t make your PLMS symptoms worse.

Several medications can treat PLMS such as anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, narcotics, and dopamine antagonists. Dopamine antagonists are the standard medication prescribed for PLMS. While there is no cure for PLMS, taking the medication regularly can provide you with the relief you need.

If you are dealing with any issues falling or staying asleep in Columbia, SC, then it’s time to schedule an evaluation with the sleep experts at Bogan Sleep Consultants. Helping you get a better night’s rest is our job. Call 803-251-3093 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Richard Bogan today.