My Blog
By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
January 29, 2021
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: sleep apnea   Snoring  

Could your snoring be a sign of a more serious underlying issue?
 

From a night of imbibing to a sinus infection, there are many reasons why we may suddenly find ourselves snoring; however, when the infection clears up or we choose not to reach for that second glass of wine, we often find that snoring goes away. But what if it doesn’t? Loud, persistent snoring, night after night, can be a sign of a sleep disorder known as sleep apnea. Here’s what you should understand about snoring and sleep apnea, as well as signs that it may be time to see our Columbia, SC, sleep doctor, Dr. Richard Bogan.
 

The Majority of People with Sleep Apnea Snore
 

While not everyone who snores will have sleep apnea, most people who have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea snore. So, how can you tell if your snoring could be a sign of something more? You could be dealing with sleep apnea if you experience,
 

  • Frequent morning headaches
  • Extreme daytime fatigue
  • Increased irritability and mood swings
  • Poor concentration and memory loss
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Decreased sex drive
  • High blood pressure

Know the Risk Factors
 

It’s also important to recognize the risk factors that could increase your chances of dealing with sleep apnea. Some of those risk factors include,
 

  • Being obese or overweight
  • Using sedatives or alcohol, particularly at night
  • Family history of sleep apnea
  • Older age
  • Have narrow airways
  • Smoking
  • Being male
  • Hypothyroidism

If you have any of these risk factors and you deal with regular snoring fits, it’s a good idea to schedule a consultation with our Columbia, SC, sleep team to find out if you could be dealing with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Being overweight or obese is a serious risk factor, as Harvard Medical School states that around two-thirds of people with OSA are also overweight or obese.
 

Treating Sleep Apnea
 

If your symptoms are minor, there are certain lifestyle changes that you can start making today that can improve the quality of your sleep. If you have mild OSA then lifestyle changes may be all you need. Some of these changes include,
 

  • Avoiding sedatives or alcohol around bedtime
  • Losing excess weight
  • Quitting smoking
  • Changing your sleep position (sleeping on your side rather than your back)
  • Using a humidifier in your bedroom

If you are dealing with moderate to severe forms of sleep apnea, we can provide you with CPAP therapy, which can help keep airways open while you sleep to improve the quality of your sleep, manage your symptoms and help you maintain better health.
 

If you deal with nights of loud snoring followed by days of fatigue and brain fog, you could be dealing with sleep apnea. Let the sleep specialists at Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia, SC, help you get a better night’s sleep. Call us at (803) 251-3093 to schedule an evaluation.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
January 29, 2021
Category: Sleep Medicine
Tags: Sleep   Sleep Hygiene  

Quality sleep is key to maintaining good mental and physical health. Here’s how to improve your sleep.
 

Sadly, people treat sleep like a luxury these days, but bad sleep impacts every facet of our health and life. You may notice that after a bad night’s sleep you’re more irritable, prone to mood swings and you eat everything in sight. So, it’s not surprising that bad sleep could also be sabotaging your weight loss efforts. While some people are dealing with true sleep disorders that impact their ability to get proper, restorative sleep, our Columbia, SC, sleep doctor Dr. Richard Bogan also sees people who simply have bad sleep hygiene. Luckily, with a little dedication, this is a fairly easy fix.
 

Why is good sleep so important?
 

Even just one bad night of sleep can cause insulin resistance, increasing our risk for obesity and diabetes. Poor sleep is also linked to mood disorders, weakened immune systems and heart disease. Unfortunately, some people deal with sleep problems such as sleep apnea, which causes oxygen deprivation and restless sleep.
 

This poor sleep leads to imbalances in blood sugar, insatiable hunger and cravings, all of which can increase a person’s risk for hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Simply put, bad sleep is a serious problem. If you suspect that you might have a sleep disorder such as sleep apnea, it’s important to turn to our Columbia, SC, “dream team’ to find out.
 

How much sleep do I need to get each night?
 

The National Sleep Foundation states that adults should get between 7-9 hours of sleep per night. This also includes individuals over 65 years old. You may find that you feel great after just 7 hours of sleep while others may need a full 9 hours to wake up feeling refreshed. This may take some trial and error, but you’ll soon be able to tell just how much sleep you’ll need to feel your best.
 

What is good sleep hygiene?
 

We see a lot of bad sleep habits here in our office. Some of the ways in which you can instantly get better and deeper sleep is by,
 

  • Getting on a consistent sleep schedule, which means going to bed and getting up at the same time every day (yes, even on weekends)
  • Turning off electronics (including cell phones) at least 30 minutes before bedtime, but ideally 2 hours before bed (blue light suppresses melatonin, which can keep you awake)
  • Make sure that you are getting at least 20 minutes of sunlight each day to help you brain regulate sleep cycles
  • Find ways to manage stress, whether through meditation, yoga, light stretching or journaling
  • Consider taking supplements such as melatonin, magnesium or valerian root before bed

If you are having trouble falling asleep or you wake up in the middle of the night, you may wish to turn to Dr. Bogan and his team of sleep specialists in Columbia, SC. To schedule a sleep consultation with the team at Bogan Sleep Consultants, call (803) 251-3093.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
January 14, 2021
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: Sleep paralysis  

Sleep paralysis is a condition where you are unable to move or speak. It occurs right before you fall asleep or before you awaken. It's a temporary condition where you remain alert even though you can't talk or move. If you live in Columbia, SC, a specialist like Dr. Richard Bogan at Bogan Sleep Consultants offers services that can help you with sleep disorders, including sleep paralysis. Keep reading to learn more about sleep paralysis and what causes it.

 

Symptoms of Sleep Paralysis

Sleep paralysis may be scary, but it's not a dangerous condition. Symptoms of sleep paralysis include:

 

  • fear
  • hallucinations immediately before, during, or after sleep
  • the feeling that someone is pressing you down
  • the belief that something or someone is in the room with you

How Sleep Paralysis Happens

Sleep paralysis takes place each night when you enter the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of sleep. During this stage, your brain is extremely active. In fact, the REM stage is when dreaming occurs. Even though your brain is highly active during REM, your body remains immobile. This immobility is necessary because it prevents you from acting out your dreams.

 

Unfortunately, if you remain aware as you fall asleep, you experience sleep paralysis. In other words, you may feel afraid, experience pressure on your chest, believe a dangerous presence is in the room with you, or even hallucinate.

 

Sleep paralysis can happen to anyone. You're more likely to experience this temporary condition if you are sleep deprived, use certain medicines like the ones diagnosed for ADHD, or feel really stressed out. People that abuse drugs and alcohol are also more likely to suffer from sleep paralysis. Find a sleep specialist in Columbia, SC, who can give you more information about it.

 

Schedule Your Appointment

Are you worried about sleep paralysis or some other kind of sleep issue? Dr. Richard Bogan at Bogan Sleep Consultants can help you find ways to get a better night's sleep. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Richard Bogan by giving us a call at (803) 251-3093.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
December 30, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders
Tags: Nightmares   Night Terrors  

We understand how tough it is to get great rest. Some barriers to sleep are external like barking dogs or loud music, and other times it's nightmares or night terrors. Dr. Richard Bogan at Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia, SC is dedicated to helping you get a better night’s rest and bounce back from nightmares or night terrors.
 

Understanding the difference between a nightmare and a night terror

Nightmares are dreams that can occur during the rapid eye movement (REM) cycle. They are usually visions of persons, places, or events that evoke strong emotions like sadness, anger, or grief. These images can be recurring at a certain point in the sleeper's life or can appear once and never again.

Sometimes nightmares can be brought on by triggers in the patient’s waking life such as stress over school, work, or other concerns. Lifestyle choices and/or poor health unrelated to sleeping may also render one susceptible to nightmares when slumbering. At times, certain images will disturb the sleep, or just abruptly stop and go away. Most of the time, details of the nightmare stay with the dreamer.
 

So what are night terrors?

Night terrors are intense bouts of fear that usually affects children aged younger than 10. They are caused by a partial awakening during the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) cycle. They can be recurring and equally as dramatic as nightmares, with patients screaming, mumbling, and exhibiting other behaviors while experiencing the episode.

While these terrors are not dangerous by themselves, parents need to protect their children from falls and other injuries as their child experiences this. Still, adults have night terrors too. According to Stanford Children’s Health, night terrors can be avoided by getting adequate nap time and having a set sleep schedule.

Sleep disturbances can interfere with normal functioning in everyday life. Lack of sleep can be uncomfortable and causes symptoms that can exacerbate other conditions. Bogan Sleep Consultants in Columbia, SC can help you figure out how to get better sleep. Call Dr. Richard Bogan at (803) 251-3093 to schedule an appointment today.

By Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC
December 30, 2020
Category: Sleep Disorders

Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS) affects four to 11% of adults. Also called nocturnal myoclonus, patients are often unaware that they have this sleep disorder until it begins to interrupt their sleep schedule. If something seems a bit off, or your significant other is showing signs of concern for your behavior while catching Z's, visit our office in Columbia, SC, to get the situation under control. At Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC, we promise to provide you with better sleep and better quality of health. Dr. Richard Bogan is here for all your needs.
 

What is Periodic Limb Movements of Sleep (PLMS)?

PLMS is common in older adults. Also associated with restless leg syndrome, it's characterized by jerking and flailing movements of the arms, legs, and even the facial muscles. What can start as mild motions can turn into grand thrashing gestures, and the greatest amount of them often expose themselves in the first four hours of sleep. Most ticks occur for only half a second in periodic intervals, but some can last for intervals separated by five to 90 seconds. Although this disorder can present itself while awake, it's most likely to occur during sleep, when it becomes the most disruptive.
 

What Causes PLMS?

Most doctors often correlate this condition to spinal cord injuries or diabetes, although majorities are unsure of the actual cause. They assume it to result from abnormal nerve passage patterns that travel from the brain to the limbs.
 

Diagnosing and Treating PLMS

When PLMS disturbs the slumber of you or your partner, it's time to see a doctor. Excessive daytime sleepiness, mood swings, and other signs of lack of sleep are all symptoms that require attention. A formal diagnosis typically requires a sleep study, where your sleep gets monitored by one of our consultants throughout the night. PLMS often responds well to anticonvulsant medication, iron supplements, benzodiazepines, and dopamine therapy. We can address any questions or concerns upon your initial visit to our Columbia, SC office.
 

If you frequently wake your partner throughout the night, schedule a consultation with one of our many professionals to get to the root of the problem and develop the appropriate treatment plan. For more information about PLMS, other conditions we treat, and services provided by Bogan Sleep Consultants, LLC, visit our website. Please call (803) 251-3093 for appointment scheduling in our Columbia, SC, office.





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